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Freddy Fitz

The founders of Persimmon Hollow Brewing Co. remember a time when their first batches of beer tasted nothing like a beer they would drink, let alone sell.

Long before the wild success of their brewery, Andy Sistrunk and Robbie Carelli slogged away to craft a delicious local beer they could be proud of sipping and selling.

In 2014, after months of physical labor remodeling an old parking garage, the duo opened their original brewery and taproom in DeLand. Throughout their remodeling process, residents would poke their heads in to say hi and check the progress of the taproom. It encouraged the pair throughout what they deemed their “labor of love” project. Even though it took twice as long as they thought it would to remodel and open, they eventually opened their doors to the public’s delight.

Persimmon Hollow Brewing Flamingo Crossing location[/caption]

“The whole community completely embraced us,” says Sistrunk of opening the taproom. “The first night we were open, we were full and it never really stopped.”

Now they brew enough beer to have new releases each week through their four locations. Their brewing schedule always includes five core beers they send to local restaurant and bar partners and then four types they package in cans and sell in addition to the flavors on tap.

Their crafting process hasn’t always been so smooth, though. Sistrunk and Carelli recall the first batch they made together as a bit of a disaster.

“We just about ruined the kitchen on the first try,” jokes Sistrunk. “From then on, we were banned to the outside.”

Since those early beer experiments, they admit they’ve come a long way.

With 81 employees and upward of 25 beers in rotation at their locations, it’s safe to say the pair is far removed from their days of making “vinegar” when they brew. When they first opened, they were a novelty to the Port Orange and DeLand areas.

Persimmon Hollow Brewing Flamingo Crossing location[/caption]

“The whole community completely embraced us,” says Sistrunk of opening the taproom. “The first night we were open, we were full and it never really stopped.”

Now they brew enough beer to have new releases each week through their four locations. Their brewing schedule always includes five core beers they send to local restaurant and bar partners and then four types they package in cans and sell in addition to the flavors on tap.

Their crafting process hasn’t always been so smooth, though. Sistrunk and Carelli recall the first batch they made together as a bit of a disaster.

“We just about ruined the kitchen on the first try,” jokes Sistrunk. “From then on, we were banned to the outside.”

Since those early beer experiments, they admit they’ve come a long way.

With 81 employees and upward of 25 beers in rotation at their locations, it’s safe to say the pair is far removed from their days of making “vinegar” when they brew. When they first opened, they were a novelty to the Port Orange and DeLand areas.

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